NEWCOMER -- NOVICE ELL
.
click here for USING TECHNOLOGY WITH NEWCOMERS....


THEMES FOR NEWCOMERS:
.
.
Alphabet (Phonemic Awareness & Phonics) ... click here
Alphabet Games Online ... click here
Alphabet Videos (phonemic awareness & phonics) ... click here
Alphabet wiki page ... click here
.
.
Animals ... click here
.
.
Body ... click here
.
.
Bugs & Insects ... click here
.
.
Clothes ... click here
.
.
Food ... click here
.
.
Health ... click here
.
.
House ... click here
.
.
School ... click here
.
.
Transportation ... click here
.
.
Verbs (Action) ... click here

.
.
.


VOCABULARY TO INCLUDE WITH UNITS:
.
Colors ... click here
.
.



.
Alphabet (& phonemic awareness) videos ... click here
.
Alphabet Train Game ... Soft Schools
drag and drop the letters in the correct order
alphabet train.PNG
.





.

CARD READERS / LANGUAGE MASTERS
lang._master_1.jpg lang._master_2.jpg
This is a great tool to provide individualized practice/reinforcement for students at all levels of English language proficiency, but especially for newcomers and beginners.
You can purchase pre-programmed cards in themes such as letters, colors, compound words, beginning sounds, etc......OR......you can purchase blank cards and program (record) them yourself with vocabulary &/or sentence patterns specific to your unit of study or specific to each student's language needs. You put a picture or word or sentence or whatever you want on the front*.....then record you voice saying what you want the students to learn.
*If you use tape or a paperclip to attach the picture to the cards, you can easily re-use the cards just by taking off the old picture & attaching a new one (& recording the new word to match).

Students run the card through the machine and listen to the pre-programmed voice (or teacher's voice). They are able to clearly hear correct pronunciation and can then run the card through again (while pushing the red button) to record their own voices repeating the word or sentence.
Then.....they run the card through again and listen to their own voices....and compare with the teacher's voice.
Students can repeat each of these steps as many times as they want.

To assess, teachers can listen to the cards a student records and document progress....or note areas of need for further instruction/practice.



Especially helpful for newcomer / beginner English Language Learners:

  • Visuals ... photos, pictures, illustrations, drawings, clipart, etc., etc., etc.
  • Real objects ... (realia)
  • Saying the same things the same way each time so students begin to understand and the language becomes 'meaningful' for them.
    • For example....Say, "Please line up" every time you want the students to line up instead of saying it a different way each time (line up, get in line, Will you line up now?, make a line, get in number order....etc.) Students begin to understand much quicker if they hear the same words each time and can match that with what they see the other students doing.
  • a 'buddy'....Ask a responsible student to be a 'buddy' to the newcomer ELL for a few days. This buddy may, or may not, speak the same first language as the newcomer ELL, but in any case, will provide a reassuring model and guide throughout the day. ELL newcomers closely watch other students in the room and try to do what the other students are doing. A buddy will be a great help in the classroom, in the cafeteria, outside on the playground, during special classes, during transition times in, or out, of the classroom. A buddy can show the new student where to put his bookbag, where to get supplies, where to sit, where to sharpen his pencil, when to stand up (sit down), when to take out a book or notebook, etc.
  • Allow the newcomer to 'sit' and listen.....even though it may look as if he's doing nothing, actually his ears and his brain are very busy with all the new sounds of the new language (English) constantly swirling around him all day long. It can be overwhelming for a while, and sometimes a new English learner just needs to sit and listen.
  • Allow the new English learner to speak his native language (if there are other students in the class who speak this language) during the 'social' parts of the day--in the cafeteria, on the playground, before the day starts, at the end of the day. Learning a new language is very intense, and sometimes it's important for a new student just to feel that he's being understood...and that he can understand someone else, too.....meaningful communication is important to everyone.
  • Use students to interpret critical or procedural information......homework folders, lunch money, field trips, picture day, parent conferences, etc. When it's important to get the information across, if there's another student in the room who can communication with the new English learner have him speak to the new student in their shared language. Have him explain critical information/procedures. (NOTE: For instruction, it's not a good idea to use other students as interpreters.....unless your classroom is part of a bilingual program. If students will be expected to take standardized tests in English, and English is the language of instruction for the rest of the students, then the newcomer English learner should be immersed in English, including academic instruction. Although this might seem to make it harder for students in the beginning, in the long run they will acquire English faster because they won't have a 'native language crutch' to rely on. If teachers consider the newcomer's low level of English proficiency and modify their instruction and their 'language' of instruction, then what's happening in the classroom becomes 'meaningful' to the newcomer. Once the student begins to understand a little, then he has a base of English language to build on.)
  • .......
  • .......
  • .......

students_standing_in_line.jpg

THEMES for "newcomers"... ..... See the "THEMES" page for general thematic resources. (Some activities/resources will need to be adapted for newcomers, taking into account their low level of English proficiency.)
  • 'Survival Vocabulary' .. letters, colors, numbers, shapes, days of the week, social language (BICS), language of classroom directions/commands (sit down, line up, open your book, raise your hand, get your lunch box/jacket/book/paper, etc, no talking, turn in your paper, etc., right/left, position words
  • School
  • Body Parts
  • Clothes
  • Health (& Hygiene)
  • Food
    • vegetables
    • fruits
    • meat
    • other (bread, dessert, junk food, snacks, 'fast' food, etc.)
  • House
  • Family
  • Transportation
  • Animals
    • Farm & Pets
    • Zoo (Wild)
  • Calendar (days of week, months of year, time, seasons, holidays)
  • Weather
  • ;




Vocabulary to integrate & reinforce in all newcomer units...
  • Position words: next to (beside), over (above), under (below), in front of, behind, through, to the right of, to the left of, etc.
  • Numbers
  • Letters
  • Colors
  • Shapes

Skills/Concepts to integrate & reinforce in all newcomer units...
  • letter names
  • letter sounds
  • beginning, middle, & ending sounds (AFTER students have acquired some English vocabulary to make this concept meaningful for them)
  • sequencing
  • retelling
  • answering in complete sentences
  • asking questions (with concrete answers): for example, What is this?, Who is this?, Where is the pencil?, What time is it?, What season is it?, etc. (Save the "why" and "how" questions until students have acquired enough English to be able to understand the concepts of 'why' and 'how' and have enough vocabulary to begin to express their thoughts in English.)
  • antonyms & synonyms
  • analogies (start off with very simple ones)
  • neat handwriting (letter formation)
  • concepts of print (punctuation, capitals, letter/word/sentence, spacing between words)
  • writing complete sentences (Start off with 'pattern' writing: for example, "The apple is red. The banana is yellow.", "I like hamburgers. I do not like pizza.", "The book is on the desk. The pencil is in the desk."......etc.)






free counters